Friday, November 2, 2018

📘🎥Friday's Film Adaptation🎥📘: The Green Mill Murder by Kerry Greenwood


Summary:
Phryne Fisher is doing one of her favorite things - dancing to the music of Tintagel Stone's Jazzmakers at the Green Mill, Melbourne's premier dance hall. And she's wearing a sparkling lobelia-colored georgette dress. Nothing can flap the unflappable Phryne - especially on a dance floor with so many delectable partners. Nothing but death, that is.

The dance competition is trailing into its last hours when suddenly a figure slumps to the ground. Phryne, conscious of how narrowly the weapon missed her own bare shoulder, back, and dress, investigates.

Phryne follows the deadly trail into the dark smoky jazz clubs of Fitzroy, into the arms of eloquent strangers, and finally into the sky, as she uncovers a complicated family tragedy from the Great War and the damaged men who came back from ANZAC cove.


Chapter One
Make my bed and light the light I'll be home late tonight Black bird, bye bye. 'Bye Bye Blackbird,' Ray Henderson
It was eleven by the Green Mill's clock when the cornet player went into a muted reprise in 'Bye Bye Blackbird,' and one of the marathon dancers plunged heavily and finally to the floor at Phryne Fisher's feet. She stumbled over him. His partner dropped to her knees with a wail.

The cornet player stopped mid-note. The tall Amazon with the bass gave one final, mellow plunk. Tintagel Stone stood up. The three musicians came forward as Phryne turned the man over with her foot and recoiled, dragging her escort with her. The jazz players bent over the fallen man, and a high female voice, much affected by gin, screamed, 'The manager! Call the manager!'

'Come away, Charles,' said Phryne calmly. 'There is something seriously wrong with that man.'

'Why, you don't mean that he's ...?' began Charles, and Phryne nodded.

It had been such a promising evening up until now, Phryne reflected, feeling Charles begin to tremble in her grasp. The monumental ceiling of the Green Mill glittered with electric stars. She herself glittered in a lobelia georgette dress with paillettes of Chinese white and diamantés. She had been dancing a foxtrot with Charles Freeman, sole scion of an extremely rich family, who was a tedious but socially acceptable escort. The two remaining contenders for the dance marathon prize (one baby Austin car, value £190) had been dragging themselves drearily around in ever-decreasing circles, requiring Phryne to dance carefully around them. She had been pleased with the dress, delighted with her dancing skill, and satisfied with her partner, who had been sufficiently snubbed to make him stop talking about his dead father's wealth and his own importance. She had been a little elevated on Grand Marnier, a flask of which reposed in her garter. She had been warmed by the admiring regard of the eponymous banjo player of Tintagel Stone and the Jazz Makers. His acetylene-blue eyes had been on her all night; they had produced an agreeable frisson.

Now she was stone-cold sober, and unenchanted, as she always was in the presence of death.

The dance marathon's surviving couple sank down, still wreathed in each other's arms, crying with exhaustion and relief and possibly triumph. Dancers milled about in the half- dark. Faces lit and vanished as the stars glittered. The manager glided onto the dance floor. He was a tall, distinguished man in perfect evening costume, worn with an Italianate air, and he summed up the situation instantly.

Dragging the marathon couple to their feet he proclaimed, 'The winners!'

They smiled sketchily as he hauled them bodily off the floor. After dancing for what seemed like years, they were so limp Phryne wondered that they did not sag out of Signor Antonio's grasp and melt down into aching puddles of ruined muscle. Both their faces were white and drained and they trembled as they stood on agonized feet. Blood seeped slowly out of the girl's shoes and stained the Green Mill's celebrated sprung floor.

'Percy McPhee and Violet King are the winners of the baby Austin car! They have danced for forty-seven hours and twenty-one minutes! Show your appreciation ladies and gentlemen, if you please!'

The patrons clapped appreciatively, Tintagel Stone's drummer gave a roll and a sting, and two waiters assisted Miss King and Mr. McPhee off the floor and into an alcove, where they were at last allowed to collapse. Miss King had begun to cry uncontrollably and Mr. McPhee did not seem far off it. They were set down on a sofa and fell instantly asleep.

'Signor, Signor Antonio, what about him?' asked a nervous waiter, pointing at the man on the floor. The signor flapped a dismissive hand. He had no patience with losers.

'Take him outside and revive him,' he said. The fallen man's partner, a girl in pale blue worn to a frazzle, ran her hand over his chest, made the discovery that Phryne knew she would make, and screamed.

'He's dead! There's blood! He's murdered!' She fainted.

And after that, of course, there was no more dancing.

The lights came up, revealing the Green Mill's dainty Dutch murals, all milkmaids and trees. Pallid faces, over-rouged or under-coloured, blinked in the glare. Nothing looks worse, thought Phryne, than a brightly lit hall which should be dim. And by God, most of the patrons looked as if they had crawled out from under the Green Mill, rather than entered through the door with a two-shilling ticket.

The girl in the pale blue dress was carried by the band to a couch, where a waitress attempted to revive her. Three bandsmen remained staring down at the corpse, the cornet player still holding his instrument out in front of him as if he had never seen it before. Phryne's escort was not proving to be of that sterling mettle which is expected of a Gentleman in a Crisis. Normally cold and aloof, he had cracked. Knuckles between teeth, he backed away from the dead man until he stumbled on the lower step of the bandstand, dislodged a cymbal, and sat down with a thump.

'I've never, I've never seen ...' he whimpered. 'I've never seen a corpse before! I've never ...'

'Well, well, pet, don't take on. Corpses can happen to anyone, you know,' soothed Phryne. 'You sit there quietly and have a little tot of this, and you'll feel better.'

She produced the flask of liqueur and unscrewed the top, pouring a liberal measure into it. This Charles took, trembling so much that Phryne had to hold both his hands and tip the spirit into his mouth. He choked, his eyes bulging like a fish, and Phryne patted him impatiently. Corpses, per se, did not discompose her. The evening looked like being more interesting than she had expected when she had accepted Charles Freeman's invitation to dance at the Green Mill, and she was not minded to be distracted by her escort developing the vapours.

'Bear up, man, it is not the dead you have to be afraid of. The living are much more dangerous.'

This produced another sob.

The blue eyes which had been observing her so closely all night were fixed on her now, and she turned from Charles to face Tintagel Stone's intense gaze. A pretty man, she thought, smoothing down her decorative dress, very pretty. Midnight-black hair and pale skin and lapis-lazuli eyes. She smiled and held out the flask.

'Have some?' she offered, and Tintagel accepted gratefully. He poured out a drink, gulped it down, and went back to the bandstand, putting his banjo carefully on its stand before holding out a hand to the bass player, who looked shocked. Phryne nodded, and Grand Marnier was served all round. The band retreated to their dais and looked around helplessly at the hysterical throng. The patrons, primed with gin brought into the Green Mill in defiance of all the licensing laws, were shrieking like an aviary full of bad-tempered tropical birds.

'What happened, Miss?' asked Tintagel Stone gravely, returning the depleted flask. 'Is that chap dead?'

'Oh yes,' said Phryne evenly, suppressing Charles' next whimper with a firm hand on his shoulder. 'And he has been murdered. Therefore we shall have to stay here until the police come, all very inconvenient.'

She heard a gasp behind her, and wondered which member of the band found this surprising.

'My name is Phryne Fisher,' she added, surveying Tintagel Stone with appreciation. 'Are you Mr. Stone? We may as well get comfortable. It is going to be a long night. Not, may I add, the sort of long night I envisaged, but a long night nevertheless.'

Charles gave another, more pathetic, choke, and shoved Phryne aside as he leapt up and ran. She was minded to be offended until she saw that his destination was the gentlemen's cloakroom, and was pleased that he still retained sufficient social grace not to be sick in company.

Tintagel Stone caught and steadied her. His forearms were very strong. A consequence of being a banjo player, perhaps? She rested both palms lightly against a beautifully muscled chest. Close to, his eyes were not lapis but sky-blue, and the wide mouth curved humorously. He smelt of wilting starched collar and orange liqueur, a combination new to Phryne.

'I can stand up by myself, you know,' she commented. 'And here come the cops. Oh, super!'

'Super? What's super about the cops?' snarled the cornet player, voice rising in mockery.

'What's good about the cops?'

'It's a nice cop,' said Phryne. 'It's Detective Inspector Robinson.'

Detective Inspector John 'Call me Jack, Miss Fisher, everyone does' Robinson entered the Green Mill with three attendant constables and was struck deaf by the noise. Voices ranging from lowest bass to shrillest soprano were clashing in a discordant symphony worse than Schoenberg. The huge hall was blindingly bright with every possible jazz colour. His entry caused a brief silence, then the din broke out again, voices exclaiming and crying and babbling on the edge of hysteria.

'If I handle this wrong,' thought Robinson, preserving his calm with an effort unperceived by his constables, 'there will be a riot, and the chief will have my guts for garters.' He walked into the middle of the hall and raised his hands.

'Quiet!' he bellowed in a great voice, and silence fell. He swallowed to regain his hearing and continued.

'Ladies and gentlemen, would you all sit down. There's no danger. I won't keep you long. But we'll all get home earlier if I have your full cooperation and some quiet. Thank you.'

There was a brief flurry as the dancers left the floor and conversation began again, more softly, and without the presage of panic. The crowd had drawn away from the figure lying quite still on the floor in front of the bandstand, as though fearing contamination.

'They needn't worry,' Detective Inspector Robinson remarked as he approached the corpse, regulation boots thudding like hammers on the sprung floor. 'Diphtheria's catching, but death ain't. Now, Sir, are you the manager? What's happened here?'

Signor Antonio, shocked out of his Italian accent, was wringing his hands and almost weeping with chagrin.

'In my establishment!' he whispered. 'It is too much!' His voice rose to a shout. 'You must find out who did it at once!'

'Oh, woe, alas,' quoted Phryne, perched on the bandstand. 'What, in our house?'

'Put on thy gown, look not so pale,' capped Tintagel Stone unexpectedly. 'I tell thee, Duncan's dead, and cannot come out of 's grave.'

Phryne looked her surprise, and he smiled a devastating smile, showing white teeth. Tintagel Stone, Phryne thought, would bear watching.

Detective Inspector Robinson sighted Phryne, sighed, and beckoned to her.

He was an unmemorable policeman, with mid-brown hair and mid-brown eyes, and he looked worried.

'Well, well, Miss Fisher, I ought to run you in for complicity; corpses bloom like daisies wherever you go, don't they? Did you see this?'

'Hello Jack, nice to see you, too. Yes, I saw it. Well, I was next to him, but I didn't see anyone stab him. Unless you think that it was really me, in which case you'd better put the cuffs on, guv'nor.'

Jack Robinson did not smile. He did not like mysteries. He was not wild about sudden deaths either.

'Police surgeon is on his way,' he commented.

'Why?'

'To pronounce life extinct.'

'I can pronounce to you now, Jack, that life is as extinct as it can possibly get. Poor man.'

The dead man was comely, youngish, with dark wavy hair on a round, childish head; a high-bridged Roman nose; full, rather sensual lips, and a bluish chin. Phryne had noticed him sagging into his partner's embrace, his face a mask of exhaustion and pain. Now he lay on his back with his feet to the band, his hands open and lax, his face calm and empty like the faces of all human husks in which the enlivening light has been doused. The only sign of injury was the round red spot on his left shirt-front where some long blade, expertly wielded, had pierced his heart.

Phryne bit her lip. He looked different from the first time she had seen him dead, but she could not bring to the surface of her mind what fact told her this.

'Dead as a doornail,' agreed Jack Robinson. 'But it's the procedure. What killed him?'

'A thin knife, I think, unless he just died of exhaustion. These dance marathons are a scandal. More like the good old days of the Colosseum than anything worthy of the twentieth century. I wonder that Signor Antonio hasn't brought in the lions.'

'He was in the marathon?'

'Yes, Jack, there were only two couples left. They had been dancing for two days, two days and nights. Criminal, isn't it? They were next to each other, blundering round in a circle, poor things, and then he fell. I tripped over him, the other two realized that they had won and slumped to the floor, and the manager came and proclaimed them the winners. I saw that this one was dead; he had that look, Jack, but before I could do anything sensible the partner discovered he was dead and screamed the place down. And there was something ...'

'Something?'

'Something different about him, but I can't recall what. The band came down to see what was happening, and the girl collapsed and was borne off to a sofa. She's over there, in pale blue. Then we all stood about and waited for you to arrive.'

'Who could have stabbed him?'

'Anyone, really. They had the lights down for the foxtrot and we were all moving.'

'Ah, dear, this is going to be one of those cases,' said Detective Inspector Robinson resignedly. 'They always are when you are involved, Miss Fisher. I'll get my constable to take all the names and addresses of the patrons, and you rack your brains to remember who was near you, and we'll ask them to stay.'

'Only me and Charles, and the plump lady in puce with that stout gentleman, and the other marathon dancers. The band might have seen something.'

'All right, I'll speak to you later, Miss Fisher. Ladies and gentlemen!' he announced in his big, confident voice. A sigh of relief went up from the apprehensive crowd. At last, someone who could Take Charge and tell them what to do. 'I'm afraid that I'm going to have to cut short your evening's dancing. If you would all proceed in an orderly manner to the foyer. There's a policewoman to search the ladies. Then if you would leave your details with the constables, you can all go home. I would like a word, however, with anyone who saw this poor chap fall, or was near when he did.'

A swift sort and a scurry of footsteps, a flourish of robes and coats and furs—some chinking suggestively as though glass bottles might be concealed therein—and the throng in the Green Mill was reduced to a few witnesses, Phryne, some recumbent bodies, and Tintagel Stone and the Jazz Makers.

The foyer of the Green Mill was huge, as large as the great hall of the Exhibition Buildings. The patrons were recovering from their shock and beginning to speculate, gossip, go into hysterics, faint, laugh or feel quietly nauseous, according to temperament. The constables wrote busily, and Signor Antonio stood at the door handing out apologies and tickets for next week's dance with distracted generosity.

The main doors swung shut. The huge hollow space which was the inside of the mill made itself felt. Someone was stopping the sails, which turned when the hall was open, and their noise was also cut off.

Detective Constable North was suddenly and piercingly conscious of the squeak produced by his new boots every time he moved. He was an experienced and somewhat battle-scarred cop, recently transferred from Vice.

Phryne went back to sit with the band and for the first time remembered her escort.

'Where's Charles? He should have thrown up his heart and been back by now.'

'Is he your husband?' asked Mr. Stone, with every appearance of really wanting to know.

'He does not have that honour,' said Phryne absently. 'No one does. I promised his mother that I'd look after him and he is a passable dancer. Damn it, where can he be? Oh, Constable,' she called to Detective Constable North, whom she had met in one of her forays into Fitzroy brothels to search for lost girls. 'There's a gentleman in the ... er ... Gentlemen's who was a witness. He might still be sick, he has never seen a corpse before. Can you hale him out? He's been gone a long time.'

Detective Constable North flicked a glance at his superior, who waved a hand, and then padded off to the cloakroom, trying not to squeak.


Miss Fisher's plans to enjoy a night in a Jazz club are interrupted by a puzzling crime when a man collapses suddenly on the dance floor, murdered.

Release Date: March 9, 2012
Release Time: 55 minutes

Cast:
Essie Davis as Phryne Fisher
Nathan Page as Detective John 'Jack' Robinson
Hugo Johnstone-Burt as Hugh Collins
Ashleigh Cummings as Dorothy 'Dot' Williams
Travis McMahon as Bert
Anthony Sharpe as Cec
Richard Bligh as Mr. Butler
Wendy Hughes as Adele Freeman
Rohan Nichol as Vic Freeman
Toby Schmitz as Charles Freeman
Deni Hines as Nerine Rogers
Arthur Angel as Ben Rodgers
Simon Lyndon as Tintagel Stone
Adrian Auld as Bobby Sullivan
Lauren Clair as Pansy Shore
Stephen Whittaker as Leonard Stevens
John Arnold as Dr. Johnson






Author Bio:
Kerry Greenwood was born in the Melbourne suburb of Footscray and after wandering far and wide, she returned to live there. She has a degree in English and Law from Melbourne University and was admitted to the legal profession on the 1st April 1982, a day which she finds both soothing and significant.

Kerry has written twenty novels, a number of plays, including The Troubadours with Stephen D'Arcy, is an award-winning children's writer and has edited and contributed to several anthologies. In 1996 she published a book of essays on female murderers called Things She Loves: Why women Kill.

The Phryne Fisher series (pronounced Fry-knee, to rhyme with briny) began in 1989 with Cocaine Blues which was a great success. Kerry has written thirteen books in this series with no sign yet of Miss Fisher hanging up her pearl-handled pistol. Kerry says that as long as people want to read them, she can keep writing them.

Kerry Greenwood has worked as a folk singer, factory hand, director, producer, translator, costume-maker, cook and is currently a solicitor. When she is not writing, she works as a locum solicitor for the Victorian Legal Aid. She is also the unpaid curator of seven thousand books, three cats (Attila, Belladonna and Ashe) and a computer called Apple (which squeaks). She embroiders very well but cannot knit. She has flown planes and leapt out of them (with a parachute) in an attempt to cure her fear of heights (she is now terrified of jumping out of planes but can climb ladders without fear). She can detect second-hand bookshops from blocks away and is often found within them.

For fun Kerry reads science fiction/fantasy and detective stories. She is not married, has no children and lives with a registered wizard. When she is not doing any of the above she stares blankly out of the window.


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Release Blitz: Secrets Revealed by AG Carothers

Title: Secrets Revealed
Author: AG Carothers
Series: Dragon War Chronicles #2
Genre: M/M Romance, Urban Fantasy, Paranormal
Release Date: November 2, 2018
Summary:
Last time on Dragon War Chronicles, we left our heroes fighting for their lives in the midst of battle...

Kollin races against time to get samples of the weapon used in Canada to their lab in Oslo. Kenshin races to get Danica back home in time to save her, Aiden and Xander. Danica's allies start to converge in Toulouse in aide and help to prepare for what may come.

Will Kollin be able help save Danica, Aiden, and Xander before all is lost? Will Matt be able to track down who's responsible for a new weapon that threatens them all? What will happen when Danica's biggest secret is revealed?

Secrets are revealed that will change the future for all dragon and SLIP kind alike.

Warning: This book contains explicit sexual situations that are MM, MF, and MMMF. There are romantic relationships displayed that are MM and some depictions of loving and consensual BDSM relationships. There are also bad puns, nebulous taboo content, and a game of tag with an invisible dragon.


"What are you doing, Mathieu?" Xander's tone serious as he lifted his chin up with a finger.

"What we should have done years ago." Matt's voice was soft as he continued to lave Xander's chest.

"But…" Xander tried to push himself back to put space between them.

"No, buts I know. I almost lost both of you." Matt interrupted, pulling him back. "You don't know what it was like when they brought you home." Matt hissed through clenched teeth. Xander held still, and Matt looked up at him, his gaze piercing Xander's. Matt bared his soul and showed him all the pain he was holding back with just one look into his usually vibrant eyes. Xander leaned down, his heart almost breaking at the thought of hurting Matt this way and he ran his tongue over his lips softly and kissed him tenderly.

"If something happens to me..." Fear of Matt dying because of him constricted his throat.

Matt sighed. "I know, and I accept that. I had a lot of time to think about life without you, and it's not pretty. Even though I have many more years ahead of me, you'll have to watch me grow old eventually. I don't want that either. I want this right here"—Matt waved a finger between him and Xander—" me in your arms, your lips on mine, your smile to brighten my day and the crazy dragon in the other room to drive both of us nuts for at least the next millennia." He pointed back behind Xander.

Matt cupped Xander's face in his hands bringing his head down close to his. "You are my heart, and I love you with every bit of my being." Stray tears mixed in with the water running down the sides of Matt's face. "Will you be my mate and claim me as yours for eternity?"

Xander saw the love and determination reflecting at him in Matt's eyes. He had never really thought about that before. They'd always been so caught up in the here and now that he hadn't given much thought to the many years before them. Seeing the love and pain in Matt's eyes broke his heart and he knew then that the thought of watching him die before him would break him.



Author Bio:
A. G. Carothers is actually a dragon very cleverly disguised as a human. They are a non-binary author of LGBTQIA Urban/Paranormal Fantasy, who enjoys writing original and entertaining stories. They are very excited to share the worlds they've created with you.

A.G. currently lives in Tennessee with their platonic life partner, who is not a dragon. They yearn to live back in Europe and will some day. In their spare time they are addicted to losing themselves in the lovely worlds created by other authors.

A.G. is committed to writing the stories they see in their head without restrictions. Love is blind and doesn't see gender, race, or sexuality.


FACEBOOK  /  TWITTER  /  WEBSITE
EMAIL: Info@AGCarothers.com



Secrets Revealed #2

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