Friday, June 12, 2015

Friday's Film Adaption: Mr. Blandings Builds his Dream House by Eric Hodgins


Summary:
The classic tale of leaving the city and building a house in the country, only to find country life isn't so simple. But it is hilarious.

Mr. Blandings, a successful New York advertising executive, and his wife want to escape the confines of their tiny midtown apartment. They design the perfect home in the idyllic country, but soon they are beset by construction troubles, temperamental workmen, skyrocketing bills, threatening lawyers, and difficult neighbors. Mr. Blandings' dream house soon threatens to be the nightmare that undoes him.

This internationally bestselling book by Eric Hodgins is illustrated by William Steig and was made into a film starring Cary Grant and Myrna Loy.


Film:
Release date: June 4, 1948
Running time: 93 minutes
Cast: 
Cary Grant - James Blandings
Myrna Loy - Muriel Blandings
Melvyn Douglas - William "Bill" Cole
Louise Beavers - Gussie
Reginald Denny - Henry Simms
Jason Robards, Sr. - John Retch
Lex Barker - Carpenter Foreman
Connie Marshall - Betsy Blandings
Sharyn Moffett - Joan Blandings
Ian Wolfe - Real Estate Agent Smith
Nestor Paiva - Joe Appolonio
Harry Shannon - W.D. Tesander
Tito Vuolo - Mr. Zucca


Trailer

Clips



First off, Cary Grant & Myrna Loy alone make this a classic to watch but the story is brilliant.  A classic film that may not have the prat falls that some of Grant's earlier comedies possess but still a great screwball comedy worthy of the genre.  If you're looking for a lighthearted film for summer viewing than this is one to add to your film library but it also has a great story to go with the laughs.

RATING: 

Author Bio:
Born 1899, Eric Francis Hodgins was the American author of the popular Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House (1946). Hodgins served as editor in chief of The Youth Companion, associate editor of Redbook, and then as associate editor of Fortune magazine. He became publisher of Fortune in 1937, and a vice president of Time Inc. in 1938. He quit Time Inc. in 1946 to write full-time.

His novels also included a sequel, Blandings Way, published in 1950.

He died in New York City.

Illustrator Bio:
William Steig (1907-2003) was a cartoonist, illustrator and author of award-winning books for children, including Shrek!, on which the DreamWorks movies are based. Steig was born in New York City. Every member of his family was involved in the arts, and so it was no surprise when he decided to become an artist. He attended City College and the National Academy of Design. In 1930, Steig’s work began appearing in The New Yorker, where his drawings have been a popular fixture ever since. He published his first children's book, Roland the Minstrel Pig, in 1968. In 1970, Steig received the Caldecott Medal for Sylvester and the Magic Pebble. His books for children also include Dominic; The Real Thief; The Amazing Bone, a Caldecott Honor Book; Amos & Boris, a National Book Award finalist; and Abel's Island and Doctor De Soto, both Newbery Honor Books. Steig's books have also received the Christopher Award, the Irma Simonton Black Award, the William Allen White Children's Book Award, and the American Book Award. His European awards include the Premio di Letteratura per l'infanzia (Italy), the Silver Pencil Award (the Netherlands), and the Prix de la Fondation de France. On the basis of his entire body of work, Steig was selected as the 1982 U.S. candidate for the Hans Christian Andersen Medal for Illustration and subsequently as the 1988 U.S. candidate for Writing.  Steig also published thirtAbout People in 1939, and including The Lonely Ones, Male/Female, The Agony in the Kindergarten, and Our Miserable Life.  He died in Boston at the age of 95.


Eric Hodgins
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William Steig
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Cover Reveal: If It's a Pain in the Ass You're doing it Wrong by JC Clarke

Title: If It's a Pain in the Ass You're Doing it Wrong
Author: JC Clarke
Genre: Contemporary Romantic Comedy
Expected Release Date: June 26, 2015

Summary:
His Princess was a little bit eclectic, a lot of eccentric, and a big time potty mouth. She was outgoing and loud, but held her friends and family close to her heart. She ranted about everything wrong in the world and her wild passion made him fall hard and fast. His life gave him the middle finger when she opened his eyes to the beauty around him - or right in front of him.

Her ‘Prick-a-Doodle-Do’ was uptight businessman through and through. He never saw the fun in anything and she knew right from the start that she could have fun with this man and get him to open his eyes. He made her see that she didn’t have to always be alone, even when surrounded by people. His knack of bringing out the best in her was what made her fall for him, even if she didn’t want to admit it to herself.

Both of them were raised in ‘high society’, but where one was guided by the rules, one had fun going against them. He was her new boss and she didn’t give two hoots about it, so when she was given an opportunity to express her views about a certain subject, she readily agreed.

It was now her personal mission to make the life of her boss a little harder, while experiencing a little fun along the way.

Author Bio:
J.C. Clarke lives in the heart of the New Forest in England with her husband and four children. Never a dull moment, her full house provides no shortage of inspiration which fuels her writing. She loves reading and writing a variety of genres in addition to dabbling with graphic art to create book covers, swag and more.


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Release Day Blitz: A Season for Killing Blondes by Joanne Guidoccio

Title: A Season for Killing Blondes
Author: Joanne Guidoccio
Genre: Mystery
Release Date: June 12, 2015
Publisher: Wild Rose Press
Summary:
Hours before the opening of her career counseling practice, Gilda Greco discovers the dead body of golden girl Carrie Ann Godfrey, neatly arranged in the dumpster outside her office. Gilda’s life and budding career are stalled as Detective Carlo Fantin, her former high school crush, conducts the investigation.

When three more dead blondes turn up all brutally strangled and deposited near Gilda’s favorite haunts, she is pegged as a prime suspect for the murders. Frustrated by Carlo’s chilly detective persona and the mean girl antics of Carrie Ann’s meddling relatives, Gilda decides to launch her own investigation. She discovers a gaggle of suspects, among them a yoga instructor in need of anger management training, a lecherous photographer, and fourteen ex-boyfriends.

As the puzzle pieces fall into place, shocking revelations emerge, forcing Gilda to confront the envy and deceit she has long overlooked.


I noticed a man making his way through the crowd that had gathered outside the front window. Tall and lean with salt and pepper hair, the man sported a black leather coat and a light gray suit. When he stopped to talk with Uncle Paolo, he flashed a badge. As I approached the two men, my heart started beating faster. Carlo Fantin. How could I have forgotten my old high school crush? If anything, he looked even better now than he did back then. He hadn’t bulked up or lost his hair. He was still hunk material.

He stared, his blue eyes widening in surprise and something else I couldn’t quite define. Amusement. Anticipation. Maybe even lust. Whatever it was, he had stopped talking to Uncle Paolo and was now giving me his full attention.

He flashed the beautiful smile that had once captivated me and every other female student at Sudbury Secondary. “Hello, Gilda. It’s good to see you again. Uh, in spite of these circumstances.”

“Hi Carlo, I’m–”

“Detective Fantin.” My uncle shouted.

Before I could say anything, Aunt Amelia piped up, “We’re so glad you came, Detective. We’ll sleep better tonight knowing that you’re in charge.”

My mother and Sofia appeared at my side. All those years ago when I had fantasized about connecting with Carlo, I had envisioned many wonderful scenarios where we would bump into each other and fall in love—on the beach, dance floor, even at a bar. Never in a million years, did I think we would reconnect in these circumstances with my family in tow.



Author Bio:
In high school, Joanne dabbled in poetry, but it would be over three decades before she entertained the idea of writing as a career. She listened to her practical Italian side and earned degrees in mathematics and education. She experienced many fulfilling moments as she watched her students develop an appreciation (and sometimes, love) of mathematics. Later, she obtained a postgraduate diploma as a career development practitioner and put that skill set to use in the co-operative education classroom. She welcomed this opportunity to help her students experience personal growth and acquire career direction through their placements.

In 2008, she took advantage of early retirement and decided to launch a second career that would tap into her creative side and utilize her well-honed organizational skills. Slowly, a writing practice emerged. Her articles and book reviews were published in newspapers, magazines, and online. When she tried her hand at fiction, she made reinvention a recurring theme in her novels and short stories. A member of Sisters in Crime, Crime Writers of Canada, and Romance Writers of America, Joanne writes paranormal romance, cozy mysteries, and inspirational literature from her home base of Guelph, Ontario.


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Release Day Blitz: The Heartbeat Thief by AJ Krafton

Title: The Heartbeat Thief
Author: AJ Krafton
Genre: New Adult, Fantasy
Release Date: June 12, 2015
Summary:
Haunted by a crushing fear of death, a young Victorian woman discovers the secret of eternal youth—she must surrender her life to attain it, and steal heartbeats to keep it.

In 1860 Surrey, a young woman has only one occupation: to marry. Senza Fyne is beautiful, intelligent, and lacks neither wealth nor connections. Finding a husband shouldn’t be difficult, not when she has her entire life before her. But it’s not life that preoccupies her thoughts. It’s death—and that shadowy spectre haunts her every step.

So does Mr. Knell. Heart-thumpingly attractive, obviously eligible—he’d be her perfect match if only he wasn’t so macabre. All his talk about death, all that teasing about knowing how to avoid it…

When her mother arranges a courtship with another man, Senza is desperate for escape from a dull prescripted destiny. Impulsively, she takes Knell up on his offer. He casts a spell that frees her from the cruelty of time and the threat of death—but at a steep price. In order to maintain eternal youth, she must feed on the heartbeats of others.

It’s a little bit Jane Austen, a little bit Edgar Allen Poe, and a whole lot of stealing heartbeats in order to stay young and beautiful forever. From the posh London season to the back alleys of Whitechapel, across the Channel, across the Pond, across the seas of Time…

How far will Senza Fyne go to avoid Death?

Speaking “English” English: Cockney Rhyming Slang
The Heartbeat Thief is a historical fantasy that follows the journey of a girl who learned a secret that was quite dangerous for an English girl in 1860s Surrey: the secret of immortality.

As a writer, I faced a challenge. Not only was I writing a historical, but one that would span many different time periods, in various countries. What had I been thinking? : ) This wouldn’t just be a case of making up a story—this was going to involve serious research.

I don’t mind research. (In fact, writers tend to do it without even realizing it—everything we see or hear or read or experience is potential research for a book.) However, I’m easily distracted when doing Internet research. One page leads to another and another and the next thing I know I’m three hours away from my original query (but a happy, happy reader, nonetheless.)

One particular scene in The Heartbeat Thief involved Senza’s stay in Whitechapel in late 1888. You hear the neighborhood, you hear the year…you must know the story.

It wasn’t enough to research names, dates, maps of East London during the time. When I write, I hear the characters conversing in my head. Trouble is, I didn’t spend much time in Whitechapel in the late 19th century, so I needed to research the sounds of Whitechapel.

Every region has its own dialects and slang. In East London, there was a particular slang that grew amongst criminals and dodgy folk. They used the slang as code—that way, they could speak without their information being overheard by the wrong ears. Some of it was to hide vulgarity and some of it was just fun to say.

Whitechapel and Spitalfields were considered Cockney neighborhoods, so the characters we meet in The Heartbeat Thief would have been fluent in Cockney rhyming slang. A country-born manor-bred woman such as Senza Fyne was sure to be completely bewildered the first time she encountered one of the residents and attempted conversation.

Cockney rhyming slang
When I came across this dialect, I realized that there was an entire separate world of English to be discovered…and, once I delved into the phenomenon of Cockney rhyming slang, I was completely hooked. It would days before I got back to actually working on my manuscript and by then, I was using the slang so much my family thought I’d suffered a minor stroke.

My research also put to rest lingering questions I had from the first time I watched Austin Powers: Goldmember. (Yes, I know I just dated myself by referring to a movie from 2002.)  Remember this scene with Myers and Caine?

Austin: Listen, dad, if you are going to say naughty things in front of these American girls then at least speak English English.
[Nigel looks back at girls]
Nigel: All right, my son: I could've had it away with this cracking Julie, my old China. (Subtitle: I was about to make love to this pretty girl.)
Austin: Are you telling pork-pies and a bag of trout? Because if you are feeling quigly, why not just have a J. Arthur? (Is this true? If you were aroused, why didn't you pleasure yourself?)
Nigel: What, billy no mates? (What, alone?)
Austin: Too right, youth. (Indeed.)
Nigel: Don't you remember the crimbo din-din we had with the grotty Scots bint? (Remember Christmas dinner with the Scottish girl?)
Austin: Oh, the one that was all sixes and sevens! (The insane one?)
Nigel: Yeah, yeah, she was the trouble and strife of the Morris dancer what lived up the apples and pears! (She was the wife of the dancer who lived upstairs.)
Austin: She was the barrister what become a bobby in a lorry and... (A lawyer who became a policeman in a truck) [inaudiably] (????????)...
Austin & Nigel: --tea kettle!
Nigel: And then, and then--
Austin & Nigel: She shat on a turtle!

Of course, when I first saw the movie the only thing that made sense was the last line…and that didn’t really make any sense at all. (But at least I knew what a turtle was.)

After a bit of researching, I was able to translate Austin Powers all by myself (I thank you) and even tried a hand at the lingo myself.
*Ahem*

In The Heartbeat Thief, Senza was the most innocent ribbon and curl when she went to Whitechapel. Her very best china was a brass nail but then some bushel of coke took a shovel and spade to the birds they knew and the next thing you know, it’s off to the overcoat maker. Again. Poor fing can’t catch a break.

So, anyway that’s Cockney rhyming slang. And it’s a whole different kind of English than the kind we speak here in eastern Pennsylvania. (Although…we do have a unique slang of our own in these parts. How’s this for a linguistic cage match: Cockney verses Coal Region Speak)

As much fun as it was to learn more about Cockney rhyming slang, you won’t find large portions of The Heartbeat Thief written with it. Unless you’re well versed in the dialect, you’d need a reference or two to translate it all—and in the process, you’d get as distracted from reading the story as I did when I was writing it!

But when you’re reading a passage from Senza’s stay in Whitechapel, I hope you’ll hear the characters conversing in your head while you read. If you do, then all my hours of watching mini-series and movies and reading novels research totally paid off.

What inspired the story of The Heartbeat Thief?
It started with a single scene, a conversation between a young woman and a mysterious stranger who steals up beside her at a funeral.

A lot of my stories start out like this, a single scene with no other context. It’s as if I happen across a conversation between strangers and only see one tiny snippet of their story. Sometimes, the scenes get written and tucked away in an “ideas” folder on my hard drive, lying dormant. Sometimes, a trickle of life stirs within, and a story grows out of that tiny seed.

Sometimes, the seed germinates and grows and blooms into a novel. That’s what happened with that first passage—it was the seed that grew into The Heartbeat Thief.

I went back to the oldest draft of the story and found that original seed. Here is the passage as I’d first written it:

That frightens you, doesn't?

She didn't turn to look at him. His presence was like a thick fog, tenuous yet flowing, something she felt along her skin. She didn't need to look at him—she knew right where he was. That sense of nearness, something she recognized even for all his strangeness.

She knew him. Didn't know why, or how. And she didn't care. It was simply what was.

She pinched her lips together, watching a woman bent in grief, clutching a handkerchief to her mouth. “Doesn't it frighten everyone? Dying--in such a sudden way—“

Ah, it's not the suddenness, or the surprise, or even the shock. It's the brick wall at the end of the road of life. You don't like the ending, no matter how it comes.

She tilted her head, just enough that she could capture him in her periphery. “No. I don't like the ending.”

He drifted closer, hovering just over her shoulder, like an umbrella. His mouth close to her ear, he chuckled a sonorous tone. Why would you? Your beauty, faded? Your charms, withered? Your friends and admirers, all gone away? You'll die alone, bienaimee. Everyone dies alone.

She tugged her shawl tighter about her shoulders. “Don't say that.”

But it is truth. Oh, if only there was a way to avoid all that.

“No one lives forever.”

Do they not?

His voice held such a curious tone, a tease in the words that caught her attention. “In the afterlife, yes.”

In this life.

She faced him, locking her gaze with his. His dark eyes glittered and a smile tugged at the corners of him mouth. “Why would you say things, here?”

Where better to admit the truth? He stole behind her, trailing his finger along her shoulders. In this place, life meets death. They stare each other in the face. The only difference between them is that the dead no longer care.

He drew back, his sudden withdrawal leaving a cold mist on her skin. The only question that remains is…do you still care, bienaimee? 

She wrinkled her nose. “Of course, I still care.”

Then, he said, his voice deepening into a throaty chuckle. Don't die.

She turned to admonish him for his audacity but, when she spun around, he was gone.

No way could something like this stay dormant in a dusty old file. The stranger’s mystery and his shadowy threat and the promise of eternal life simply held me captive, and I knew it would haunt me until I wrote it.

That was where The Heartbeat Thief came to life.

Where did the characters get their names?
One character was named by a fan on Facebook, one name was inspired by a song, and one simply named himself.

Felicity Keating is a close friend of the main character, and was named in an impromptu contest I held on Facebook. I had a name for her but I felt like doing something spur-of-the-moment. I loved the suggestion of Felicity because it was so fitting for the character and what she symbolized. (The Facebook Friend who suggested the name is mentioned in the Acknowledgements section of the book.)

The main character is Miss Constance Fyne, who prefers her nickname “Senza”. Her given name, Constance, alludes to the word “constant”. The suffix con- means with. Senza is Italian for “without”.
Her last name Fyne is a play on fine, or fin: French for end.

Senza Fyne is a play on the Italian word senzafine, which means “endless”. Fitting name for a girl who seeks the secret to eternal youth.

I love the word senzafine. I learned it when I heard the Italian metal band Lacuna Coil sing their song of the same name. It’s my absolutely favorite LC song.

One line of the song, when translated into English, fits Senza perfectly: I’m standing still in this moment of pure madness…I don’t know if I wish for good or evil although perhaps sin will give me more…

Playing opposite to Senza is a tall, mysterious stranger who teases her with secretive smiles and suggestions of magic. From their first meeting, he calls her bien-aime, which is French for “beloved”.

When she demands his name, he listens to the tolling of a nearby church bell before calling himself Mr. Knell.

But he has an older name. A much older name. And it will take Senza a very, very long time before she realizes just who he truly is.

The song “Senzafine” fits him, too. One particular verse fits Senza’s dark seducer perfectly. There is no life without me. There is no choice without me. 

And Senza utterly believes him.

How did the work of Edgar Allan Poe inspire this story?
I’ve been a Poe fanatic from an early age. There is something about that tragic man that keeps me captivated: his unwavering stare into the depths of the shadows that filled his life, his penchant for beautiful, melodramatic language, his undying devotion to the people he’d loved and lost.

My favorite Poe spots are in Baltimore (where he’d once lived and is interred) and in Philadelphia (where one of his homes has now become part of the National Park Service). It’s believed that his story “The Black Cat” was inspired by the basement of that house. (I have a black cat Webkinz that I would love to stick into a hole in the wall there but the husband says NO THAT’S VANDALISM AND JAIL and other husband-type warnings. Such a party pooper.)

A few years ago, I had the chance to visit the Rare Books department at the Philadelphia Free Library, where they had Poe’s work on display. I could have spent a week in there, with only a thin pane of glass between my hand and the pages touched by Poe’s very pen. The original manuscript of Rue Morgue was inches away from my face. I was in complete thrall. (The husband rolled his eyes and moved me along.)

While my short stories and poetry often pay a small tribute to him, this is the first full-length work that I’ve devoted to his style. I let all the wonderful macabre shadows creep in and take over while I was writing. The Heartbeat Thief also includes specific references to “The Masque of the Red Death”.

In “The Masque of the Red Death” a wealthy lord turns his home into a sealed fortress in an effort to protect himself and his close friends from the Red Death, a plague that was spreading through the country. One night he threw a party for his guests…but someone unexpected showed up. The unexpected guest was dressed as a ghoul bathed in blood and everyone fell dead at its feet. (The End.)

Elements of “Masque” are present throughout The Heartbeat Thief. Excerpts from Poe’s story are used in the section introductions, setting the tone of the chapters to follow. The novel’s structure was also loosely based upon the flow of Poe’s story—Prince Prospero's seven apartments now become the seven major settings of the story. I used color references and allegorical context to connect Senza's journey through time to the passage of Poe's ill-fated party goers, right the very last black room, where Death awaited them all.

Overall, I hope that the theme, the atmosphere, and the character’s obsession with life and death would do my idol proud. I hope to visit Baltimore again soon, just to stop into Westminster Burying Ground for a moment to say hello, to offer another bit of thanks for his unending inspiration, and to leave a few pennies on his gravestone.

Author Bio:
AJ Krafton is the author of New Adult speculative fiction. Her debut The Heartbeat Thief is due out on Kindle in June 2015. Forthcoming titles include Taking' It Back & Face of the Enemy. She's a proud member of the Infinite Ink Authors. AJ also writes adult spec fic as Ash Krafton.


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Release Day Blitz: Run From You by Kandice Michelle Young

Title: Run From You
Author: Kandice Michelle Young
Series: Run #2
Genre: Erotica
Release Date: June 12, 2015
Summary:
Sebastian called me his princess, but he was far from my white knight. He was my drug. One hit and I was addicted to him.

I ran from him to save my life. I kept running to regain my sanity. Kyle would help me with that. His warmth and familiarity were just what I needed to get back on track. Beautiful in his own right, Kyle was everything I once knew to be good about the world. Kyle was perfect for me, he always had been.

Except he wasn't Sebastian, he could never be. The horrors of my past pulled me away from him. The nightmares of my present would bring us back together. Confused though I was, I knew Sebastian was the only choice. The damage done was great, our love greater. Surviving each other would take everything we had, but it was the only option.

Every mistake we had made would collapse on top of us, burying us alive in a mountain of anger and guilt. Neither of us could have prepared for what was coming. The only way out was through. The question became, would we be strong enough to make it through together or would our secrets tear us apart once more?


     Kyle comes behind me and I grind my ass against him. His hands run the length of my sides and down, as my hips gently rock into him. His smell is so familiar that for a few minutes I allow myself to become intoxicated by it. Turning, I look into his blue eyes as I sway seductively in front of him.
     “You’re trying to kill me aren’t you,” he jokes.
     “You’ll enjoy every minute of it,” I reply, placing his hand on my back and rocking into him without breaking eye contact.
     He grips my bare back and lowers his lips next to my ear. “It’s not nice to tease, Dani.”
     Leaning my mouth against his jaw, I whisper, “Who says I’m teasing, Ky?”
     Fisting my hair into his hand, he lines our faces together. “You’re always teasing, sexy. You love playing games with me. It’s what you’re good at.”
     “Haven’t you heard,” I ask, rolling my tongue over my lips. “It’s my birthday. I’m officially too old for playing games.”
     He kisses me and I let him. I’m not sure if it’s the alcohol, the atmosphere, the way that my sweat covered body feels against his. All I know is that I enjoy it too much for someone who’s just had her heart broken. My entire body melts against him as he works my tongue with his own. The familiar pull of hot desire grabs at my belly and my nipples harden. I consider pulling away, but I’m shoved to the side before I have the chance.
    “Get the fuck off of her,” Sebastian growls.
    “Whoa! Chill,” Kyle replies.
    “It would be wise for you to say your goodbyes and walk away,” Sebastian suggests.
     My blood runs cold when I look up at him. His gray eyes are edging dangerously close to black. His teeth are gritted and the vein on his forehead is visible. I watch as his flexed jaw clenches with tension. This is why I can’t be with him. The demons that live inside of him, fueling this aggression. I can’t be around it. I’m not safe.
    “Let’s go, Kyle,” I say, desperately. “No one wants any trouble.”
    “You can’t be serious,” Sebastian scoffs. “You’re not going anywhere with him, Danielle.”
     He grabs my arm and I feel as though my heart leaps into my throat. Remembering to focus on my breathing, I fight the panic attack that I can feel coming on.
     “Let go of me, Sebastian,” I reply. “This isn’t the place for this.”
     “You’re not going anywhere, but outside with me,” he says, pulling me off the dance floor.
     “I don’t think so, Black,” Kyle says. “I get it. You screwed things up and now you can’t live with yourself. I’ve been there, but this possessive bullshit isn’t going to happen tonight. Danielle isn’t one of your properties. You don’t get to decide who can or cannot enter.”
     Before I can say anything in my own defense, Sebastian’s fist meets Kyle’s jaw. I scream for them to stop, but it’s useless. Kyle stumbles a little before retaliating and hitting Sebastian on the corner of his eye. Everyone around us comes to a stop. I can barely hear my own thoughts as chants and screams break out from the crowd.








Run From You

Run to You

Run to You #1
Summary:
I moved to New York for a fresh start.  I did not move here to fall for a man like Sebastian.

Sebastian Black came into my life like a storm in the peak of the night…dark, raging, all-consuming, and guaranteed to leave destruction in his wake. From the moment our eyes met, he had a hold on me. I wanted, craved, and needed him like nothing I had ever desired before.

The problem was he needed total submission. From the moment he handed me the contract, I knew what he was proposing would destroy me. What I had not planned was his ability to make me crave destruction. I would lose myself in him. Sebastian knew how to take me over the edge, and before I even knew it, I wanted to go freefalling.

It was evident that my past had the ability to destroy us. What I had not calculated was the power of his to do the same. My dark, brooding, impeccably sexual, alpha-male had his own crosses to bear. I was not sure I was strong enough to handle them, or the woman who helped chain him there.

Author Bio:
Kandice is…
…a serial lover of all things pink, self-proclaimed chocoholic, home-schooling mother, and wannabe yogi.

Her debut erotica novel, Run to You, the first in the series Run, is coming soon.

Kandi’s love of storytelling can be traced back to her fourth grade year, when a history lesson on Native Americans became too unimaginative for her liking.  She took it upon herself to liven things up by creating a story that was based on half-truths about a self-named Indian Princess. Kandice is in fact of Native American heritage (her great-grandmother was a full-blooded Cherokee) and in her own mind a princess, so you can see where her inspiration came from.  Her story was a huge hit with friends, and an author was born.

Kandice was born and raised in rural Arkansas, where she currently lives with her husband and three children. Though, if you ask her she’ll confirm that her soul is lost somewhere on the west coast waiting for the day that her body can rejoin it.


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Run From You #2

Run To You #1
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